Guide to Humanities Courses

Geography (A Level, AQA exam board) 

Why study Geography

For those interested in current issues and their surrounding environment this subject focuses on the interrelationships between people and their environments.  The course provides the opportunity to study questions, issues and problems, which arise from these relationships.  This course encourages students to think critically on a range of issues, develop possible solutions to current environmental problems and consider moral, cultural and political dimensions to problem solving and decision making.
 
What can it lead onto?
 
The skills covered in Geography are much sort after by employers.  During the course you will develop your experience and abilities in the collection and handling of primary data; representation and analysis of data sources including maps, photographs and statistics; analysing global concerns such as pollution and the energy question; presenting reports, essays and field study accounts; the application of statistical methods.
 
What are the areas of study?
 
The two elements of this course contain a people-environment approach to Geography and an enquiry approach to learning.  The syllabus content is divided into a series of chapters, Part 1 (Physical Geography) is worth 40% and covers water and the carbon cycles, coastal systems and landscapes, and hazards. Part 2 (Human Geography) is also worth 40% and covers global systems and global governance, changing places, and population and the environment.  The final 20% is a non-examined assessment based on the fieldwork under taken in Nettlecombe, Somerset in the second year.
 
 

History (A Level, OCR exam board)

Why study History? 
 
You will be equipped with the skills, knowledge and understanding for entry to employment in a wide variety of industries, or progression to higher education.  History is a highly respected, academic subject desired by employers and universities alike.  History at The Misbourne will give you a fascinating insight into our past and how it has shaped our lives today with a focus on both international history and British history. 
 
What can it lead on to?
 
The strength of History as an academic discipline opens many doors to those who study it. A confident knowledge of world history and the skills that come with it will be useful in many jobs including; law, politics, education and research, civil service, local government, journalism, archaeology, anthropological study, marketing, editing, archive work and much more.  A Level History will teach you important transferable like skills too such as, analysis, problem solving, evaluation, justification, synthesis and collaboration as well as using evidence to inform opinions – all of which are highly regarded and useful at university level.  A Level History can lead to a number of apprenticeship or volunteering opportunities including in areas such as; museums, media and publishing, library or archive work, stately homes and houses e.g. National Trust or English Heritage. 
 
What are the areas of study?
 
This qualification focuses on both British and international history; with a variety of units offered. The course will explore the transition from Tsardom to communism in Russia, the development of British history and politics between 1930 and 1997, the American Revolution and subsequent independence from British rule as well as your own research and personal study related to the Nazi regime.  This course is 80% exam and 20% coursework. 
 
 

Philosophy and Ethics (A Level, AQA exam board) 

Why study Philosophy and Ethics? 
 
You will be equipped with the skills, knowledge and understanding for entry to employment in a wide variety of industries or progression to higher education.  You will partake in structured learning with frequent opportunities to engage in discussion and debates - often due to some of the controversial topics it covers.  
 
What can it lead on to?
 
The flexibility and range of units on this course lead naturally onto several areas of employment. Knowledge of other cultures and world religions can be useful in many jobs including; law, politics, education, public services, medicine, journalism, religious ministry, counselling, aid worker, social service roles, marketing and tourism.  This course will teach you important transferable like skills such as, analysis, problem solving, evaluation, justification, synthesis and collaboration – all of which are highly regarded and useful at university level.  In addition, as this course is deemed a ‘classic’ which universities highly regard.  This course can also lead to exciting apprentice opportunities including in areas such as; art, media and publishing, e.g. exhibition guide, visitor services support, leisure, travel and tourism, e.g. tourist guide, travel adviser and; health, public services and care, e.g. community support worker. 
 
What are the areas of study?
 
This qualification focuses on Philosophy (both modern and ancient), Ethics and Christianity (how can people be Christian in today’s society?).  It discusses a wide range of issues including; abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, life after death, animal rights, religious language, evil and suffering, issues of multiculturalism, religious pluralism and the conscience.  All areas of this study are relatable to current affairs and the world that you live in.  This is a 100% examined course. 
 
 

Politics (A Level, Edexcel exam board) 

Why study Politics? 
 
A Level Politics is a fascinating subject to study in an ever changing and modernising world.  You will cover a broad range of topical and historically political issues that will enable a deeper understanding of current and previous events.  Politics provides students with transferable skills that are highly desired by universities and employers alike; you will learn to be critical and analytical in your approach to new concepts.  You will be taught to question what you learn and challenge your understanding of the status quo.  You will develop your written and oral communication skills to put forward your opinions, using research and further study to inform ideas. 
 
What can it lead on to? 
 
The strength and quality of politics as an academic discipline opens many doors to those who study it.  A confident knowledge of both British and international politics and the skills that come with it will be useful in many employment sectors, including; local or national government, journalism, law, further academic research or higher education, Civil Service fast stream, public relations, market research, charity work, non-governmental organisation, pressure groups, local political party, politician’s or MP’s assistant. 
 
What are the areas of study? 
 
This qualification focuses on both British and international politics; a variety of topics and issues are taught ranging from the British constitution and importance of modern democracy to the European Union and global governance.  Political thought and theories such as feminism, liberalism, anarchy and nationalism will also be taught to give you a broad understanding of the foundations of our political system.  This course is 100% examined. 
 
 

Psychology (A Level, AQA exam board) 

Why study Psychology? 
 
Studying A Level Psychology will give you an understanding of the processes of the mind and brain and allows you to gain insights into peoples’ motivations, perceptions and behaviour.  It will give you a different perspective on why people react in the ways they do and help you to understand people a little better. The insights you gain into thought processes, the influences of groups you interact with and many other aspects of human behaviour will all help you gain a better understanding of yourself.  You will develop your communication skills which will help you communicate effectively with others.  You will also learn how to structure an argument, to discuss a topic clearly and objectively, and to reference relevant sources. 
 
What can it lead on to?
 
Through studying Psychology you will be equipped with the skills, knowledge and understanding for entry to employment in a variety of careers or progression to higher education.  With strong research and communication skills, and an understanding of why people act the way they do, you are well prepared for careers in law, social services, education, business, and many other. You can progress from A Level Psychology to a wide range of university courses, or to vocational studies such as medical training, nursing or social work.  A qualification such as BSc (Hons) Psychology can allow you pursue further professional training including clinical, educational and occupational psychology. 
 
What are the areas of study?
 
In Year One you will cover a diverse range of topics including memory, attachments, psychopathology, social influence and biopsychology.  You will study research methods and the ability to interpret statistical results which will provide you with important skills that are transferrable to the work place.  In Year Two you will cover topics including aggression, schizophrenia and gender whilst also studying issues and debates and approaches in psychology. You will learn about applications of Psychology in the real world. 
 
 

Sociology (A Level, AQA exam board)

Why study Sociology?
 
If you are the type of person whose mind is open to the possibilities that things are not as they seem, questions traditional values that are deemed acceptable within society and, more importantly ,want to know why we hold these values to be true, then Sociology is for you.  You will need to be able to analyse statistics, find patterns in seemingly disconnected sub-cultures and develop an understanding of sociological theory.  You will also be interested in the world around you, engage in critical debate and regularly read and watch the news.
 
What can it lead to?
 
Sociology can help towards a university degree in many of the social sciences including Sociology, Psychology and Anthropology.  Sociology careers range from journalism and media research to law, politics, education, business and social work.
 
What are the areas of study?
 
You will study what is meant by the term society and sociology’s place in helping to determine the human need to be part of a collective conscience.  You will complete three units focusing on the sociology of education, sociology of crime and topics in sociology.  You will also learn about the role of research methodology in sociology and gain an in-depth understanding of sociological perspectives including the conflict and consensus approaches.